Jump to content

Συνέντευξη με τον Graham Masterton


Recommended Posts

northerain

Graham Masterton's debut as a horror author began with The Manitou in 1976, a chilling tale of a Native American medicine man reborn in the present day to exact his revenge on the white man. Since then Graham has published more than 35 horror novels, including Charnel House, which was awarded a Special Edgar by Mystery Writers of America; Mirror, which was awarded a Silver Medal by West Coast Review of Books; and Family Portrait, an update of Oscar Wildeis tale, The Picture of Dorian Gray, which was the only non-French winner of the prestigious Prix Julia Verlanger in France.

 

George Cotronis: First, a classic question: how did you start writing? And more importantly, how did you start writing horror fiction?

Graham Masterton: I wrote stories and drew my own comics when I was very young. Most of my early stories had some kind of fantastic or science-fiction connection, because I was very impressed by Dan Dare, the space-pilot of the new British boy’s comic Eagle, and by the stories of Jules Verne, such as Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea.

Not all of my stories were fantastic, though – I also wrote a series of humorous stories that owed a lot to Dickens’ Pickwick Papers, featuring a bumbling fellow called Augustus Blank who always managed to win out in the end by getting things drastically wrong.

I also loved Mad magazine, and produced dozens of parodies of poems like The Ancient Mariner and How They Brought The Good News from Ghent to Aix, all illustrated with absurdist cartoons in the style of Will Elder and the late Wallace Wood. Around the age of 10 or 11 I discovered Edgar Allan Poe and started writing short horror stories to amuse my school friends. When I was 14 I wrote a 400-page vampire novel called Morbleu, based on the idea of a giant corporation whose sole purpose was its own destruction. I got the idea from those boxes you used to wind up, and all that happened was that a lid opened, a green hand came out and switched the box off. Fortunately, the manuscript has been lost forever!

When I was 16 I came across the work of the American Beat writers like Jack Kerouac and Lawrence Ferlinghetti and William Burroughs, and I wrote two surrealistic novels Mysterious Babies (now lost) and The Electric Ambush (which somehow managed to survive, but I don’t think you’d understand a word of it.)

I also wrote a great deal of poetry in my ‘teens, for the express purpose of understanding how language worked and to develop my sense of rhythm. To me, it is vital that an author is “invisible” to the reader, and rhythm is essential in achieving this invisibility. So many sentences you read in novels these days have square wheels, and jolt the reader from one badly-constructed clause to the next.

Writing poetry also helped me to improve precision of expression, and hugely expanded my vocabulary. This is not to say that I believe in using arcane words. I hate writers who use absurdly obscure language. But the more words you know, the easier it is to choose the right one. I became a newspaper report at the age of 17 and then a magazine editor at the age of 21 and so I had very little time to write fiction in those days.

But as the editor of Penthouse I was encouraged to write several “how-to” books on sex, based on conversations with real couples about their sex lives…what they enjoyed doing, what they would have liked to do, and what they felt they needed to know. These were all very successful, and gave me an entrée into the world of publishing in New York, so that when their sales eventually began to flag, I was able to find a fiction with very little difficulty. The result was The Manitou…and the rest is history.

 

GC: And another classic: Childhood fears and their possible source?

GM: I can’t remember being afraid of anything much when I was young, except for dogs (which made me burst into tears of terror) and spiders. When it came to fear, I was always a seller rather than a buyer. I used to scare my friends by standing on the bedroom windowsill with the curtains drawn tight around my neck, so that it looked as if my disembodied head was floating near the ceiling.

 

GC: Did you have any kind of relationship with the horror genre when growing up?

GM: I have never really felt that I am a member of “the horror genre.” I like almost all of the people I have met at horror conventions and have very friendly relations with my readers. In the past couple of years I have toured France, Belgium and Poland on promotion tours and it has been tremendous to meet readers face to face. But I am not really a joiner of clubs or associations and I never read horror fiction, ever.

In fact I read very little fiction at all, which I very much regret, but it is almost impossible after a hard day in front of the pc to pick up somebody else’s novel and get lost in it. It also doesn’t help that I am super-picky about grammar, syntax and sentence construction; or that I can detect when a writer is tired, or bored, or hungry. I have been reading and re-reading the same book for nearly 25 years now, The Process by my late friend Brion Gysin.

I rarely read more than half a page at a time, but his language is so limpid that he always impresses me. Brion was great: he was the laziest man I ever met in my life.

 

GC: Where does inspiration come from? What inspires you, personally?

GM: I am inspired by people. Real people, mostly. You may notice that almost all of my novels deal with the way in which ordinary people have to deal with unimaginable terrors. So I try to develop characters who may not be secret agents or movie stars but who have simple qualities of humour and heroism. I find my ideas almost anywhere. In newspaper stories, in books about myths and legends. Most of my horror novels deal with an ancient terror being visited on the modern world, and the difficulty we have, even with our technology and our supposed sophistication, in dealing with it.

 

GC: A personal question: How do you feel when people that are close to you (family, friends, etc) read your books?

GM: My wife Wiescka reads my books first. She is my sternest critic, and if there is anything she finds boring or illogical or over-explanatory, out it goes. No arguments. My mother reads my books too but says that they make her feel queasy. My three sons have read one or two of them but rarely bother. They have their own lives to lead.

 

GC: You certainly haven’t stuck to the horror genre when it comes to writing, how did you become interested in all these other genres?

GM: I write about anything I find amusing or exciting or interesting. I like history, especially the history of the pioneering days in America, and I also like science – which is why I enjoy writing pseudo-scientific thrillers such as Plague and Genius and The Sweetman Curve. My grandfather Thomas Thorne Baker was a scientist. He was a leading figure in the early days of the development of television and wireless, and I used to spend hours in his laboratory when I was little, messing up his chemical scales.

 

GC: You have a reputation of writing books relatively fast (in comparison with other writers if you will). How does that work for you?

GM: I don’t think I write exceptionally quickly, but I never have writer’s block and I write consistently. Finish one book on Friday, start a new one on Monday. This is mostly a product of my training as a journalist. When you’ve brought out one issue, you can’t sit around preening yourself, you’ve got to get on with the next.

 

GC: Why don’t you tell us a little about what you’re working on right now? Possible plans for the future?

GM: At the moment I have a number of new horror novels lined up, including what I hope will be a spectacular epic about witchcraft. I am actually writing a thriller about a criminal conspiracy, which is all I can usefully say about it at the moment.

 

And some rapid fire ones:
 

GC: Short story or novel? And why?

GM: I love writing short stories. They can be elegant, waspish, mysterious yet highly-polished. Writing a novel can be a long, long trudge.

 

GC: Favorite book, movie, music album?

GM: Favourite book: Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov. Sad, funny, perceptive, sly, with a wonderfully-satirized suburban setting. Favourite movie: Elvira Madigan, directed by Bo Wideberg, Charming doomed, beautifully filmed. Or possibly The Suitor with Pierre Etaix., which is hilarious. Favourite music album: of all time? Almost impossible to say. But StageFright by The Band would be tolerable if I was only a desert island and could never listen to anything else.

 

GC: Choose three of your own books that you consider scariest.

GM: Black Angel (aka Master of Lies); Descendant; Walkers.

Hope this helps!

Edited by Spark
Μειώθηκε λίγο η απόσταση μεταξύ των ερωτήσεων και των απαντήσεων.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Darkchilde

Ευχαριστούμε τον Northerain γι'αυτή την πολύ όμορφη συνέντευξη. Keep it up boys and girls.

Edited by Darkchilde
Link to post
Share on other sites
northerain
Ευχαριστούμε τον Northerain γι'αυτή την πολύ όμορφη συνένετευξη. Keep it up boys and girls.

 

Και διπλο ποστ και λάθη...νομίζω χρειαζόσουν μερικές ωρες ύπνο ακόμα :p

Link to post
Share on other sites
Darkchilde

Πάντα... όταν ξυπνάς στις 6:30 το πρωϊ δεν είναι κι ότι καλύτερο! :atongue:

Link to post
Share on other sites

GM: I also wrote a great deal of poetry in my ‘teens, for the express purpose of understanding how language worked and to develop my sense of rhythm. To me, it is vital that an author is “invisible” to the reader, and rhythm is essential in achieving this invisibility. So many sentences you read in novels these days have square wheels, and jolt the reader from one badly-constructed clause to the next.

Το είχα ξαναδιαβάσει κάπου αυτό, αλλά παραμένει πάντα αποκαλυπτικό.

 

GM: I never read horror fiction, ever.

 

:eek: !!!

 

GM: Brion was great: he was the laziest man I ever met in my life.

 

Ωραίος o Brion! (Και ο GM!)

 

GM: My wife Wiescka reads my books first. She is my sternest critic, and if there is anything she finds boring or illogical or over-explanatory, out it goes. No arguments.

 

Πρέπει να είναι μια καταπληκτική γυναίκα.

 

GM: I don’t think I write exceptionally quickly, but I never have writer’s block and I write consistently. Finish one book on Friday, start a new one on Monday.

 

:death: (Πάω να πέσω από τον πέμπτο...)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Παρατηρητής
GM: I also wrote a great deal of poetry in my ‘teens, for the express purpose of understanding how language worked and to develop my sense of rhythm. To me, it is vital that an author is “invisible” to the reader, and rhythm is essential in achieving this invisibility. So many sentences you read in novels these days have square wheels, and jolt the reader from one badly-constructed clause to the next.

Το είχα ξαναδιαβάσει κάπου αυτό, αλλά παραμένει πάντα αποκαλυπτικό.

 

GM: I never read horror fiction, ever.

 

:eek: !!!

 

GM: Brion was great: he was the laziest man I ever met in my life.

 

Ωραίος o Brion! (Και ο GM!)

 

GM: My wife Wiescka reads my books first. She is my sternest critic, and if there is anything she finds boring or illogical or over-explanatory, out it goes. No arguments.

 

Πρέπει να είναι μια καταπληκτική γυναίκα.

 

GM: I don’t think I write exceptionally quickly, but I never have writer’s block and I write consistently. Finish one book on Friday, start a new one on Monday.

 

:death: (Πάω να πέσω από τον πέμπτο...)

 

 

Έλα ντε! Τι μας λέει ο τύπος...

Link to post
Share on other sites
northerain

Αν και ίσως να είναι λίγο κουφό αυτό που θα πώ, μιας και του πήρα και συνέντευξη, άποψη μου είναι οτι ο Μάστερτον είναι ο κατεξοχήν ''γράφω οτι μου πείτε, πόσο θέλετε, 2 κιλά βγήκε να τ' αφήσω?'' συγγραφέας τρόμου. Ο τύπος δούλευε σε εγχειρίδια παντός τύπου και στο Penthouse όπως λέει, ενω δε το βιβλία που έγιναν δημοφιλή(Παρίας π.χ) ξεκίνησαν απο ιστορικά μυθιστορήματα.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
synodoiporos

Kαι μία φίλη που διάβασε πρόσφατα την τριλογία του "Μάνιτου" δεν έμεινε με τις καλύτερες εντυπώσεις :

 

"...το "Μανιτού" και "Η εκδίκηση του Μανιτού" του Μάστερτον. Ενώ ξεκινάνε και τα δύο πολύ καλά, σε βάζουν στο κλίμα, τρομάζεις με τον παραμικρό θόρυβο κάπου στην μέση βαριέσαι και στο τέλος ξενερώνεις τόσο άσχημα που αναρωτιέσαι γιατί το διάβασες. Θα διαβάσω και το τρίτο μέρος της τριλογίας απλά και μόνο για να του δώσω μια ευκαιρία. Θέλω να ελπίζω ότι δεν συμβαίνει το ίδιο και στα υπόλοιπα βιβλία του Πολωνού βασιλιά του τρόμου...icon_rolleyes.gif "

 

 

Δεν έχω διαβάσει κάποιο μυθιστόρημά του, αλλά πρόσφατα τελείωσα την συλλογή διηγημάτων που κυκλοφορεί από το Οξύ με τίτλο "Σκοτεινό Φάσμα" ("The Manitou Man" ο πρωτότυπος). Χωρίς να με εντυπωσιάσει τρομερά ως τρόπος γραφής, βρήκα τις ιστορίες αρκετά ενδιαφέρουσες. Ο Masterton, απ' ότι κατάλαβα, αντλεί τα περισσότερα θέματά του από τις αρχαίες και ιθαγενείς παραδόσεις (βλ. Μάνιτου, Ιρλανδία, Πράσινος Ταξιδευτής στο Blood & Flesh). Όσον αφορά τα διηγήματα πάντως, με ενδιαφέρει αυτή η εισβολή του Παράξενου στον σημερινό μας κόσμο και στις ζωές καθημερινών ανθρώπων...

 

Θα ήθελα την γνώμη σας επί αυτών...

 

(προσωπικά, προτιμώ τον Νeil Guyman...)

Edited by synodoiporos
Link to post
Share on other sites
Nihilio

Έχω διαβάσει το Μανιτού και το Black Angel (άρχοντας του ψεύδους στα Ελληνικά) Το πρώτο ξεκινούσε αρκετά καλά, στο τέλος όμως τα ψιλοχάλαγε, ήταν όμως συνολικά καλό βιβλίο.

Το δεύτερο είχε ένα από τα εντυπωσιακότερα πρώτα κεφάλαια που έχω διαβάσει, αλλά από το δεύτερο και έπειτα βυθιζόταν στη μετριότητα. Κάποια στιγμή θα δοκιμάσω την τύχη μου και με άλλα βιβλία του όμως.

Link to post
Share on other sites
synodoiporos

Ευχαριστώ για την απάντηση, Nihilio :)

 

Oπότε, αν κατάλαβα καλά, η πλειοψηφία των απόψεων τείνει προς τον χαρακτηρισμό του "μέτριου συγγραφέα" με κάποιες ικανότητες που όμως δεν "απογειώνονται" (εσύ που έχεις διαβάσει κάποια μυθιστορήματά του νομίζω πως θα είχε ενδιαφέρον να ρίξεις μια ματιά και στα διηγήματα -όπως και για μένα θα ίσχυε το αντίστροφο - καθώς πιστεύω πως μπορούν να βγουν κάποια ενδιαφέροντα συμπεράσματα μέσα από την σύγκριση των δύο ειδών / αλλιώς "ρυθμίζει και ελέγχει" το υλικό του ένας συγγραφέας σε ένα μυθιστόρημα κι αλλιώς σε ένα διήγημα...).

 

Επίσης, αν θα σου ήταν εύκολο, θα ήθελα να γίνεις λίγο πιο συγκεκριμένος : στο Μάνιτου, τί σου άρεσε αρχικά και γιατί μετά "ψιλοχάλαγε" ; στο Black Angel, γιατί το πρώτο κεφάλαιο είναι από τα εντυπωσιακότερα που έχεις διαβάσει (σε ποιά στοιχεία δλδ θα το εντόπιζες αυτό) ;

 

Ευχαριστώ και πάλι, και ελπίζω να μην έγινα κουραστικός. Τα λέμε ;)

Edited by synodoiporos
Link to post
Share on other sites
iliosporos

Να σας πω και εγώ τη γνώμη μου που μου αρέσει πολύ ο Masterton...

Δεν μου αρέσει γιατί απαραίτητα μου προσφέρει κάτι, μου αρέσει με τον ίδιο τρόπο που μου αρέσουν σαν ταινίες το Demons, το Braindead, το Evil Dead και γεννικά όλα τα splatter.

Διάβασα πρώτα ότι κυκλοφορούσε απο τις εκδόσεις Οξύ!

Τον πολυδιαφημισμένο (λόγω λογοκρισίας στο πρώτο κεφάλαιο) Άρχοντα του Ψεύδους, Αυτοί που δεν κοιμούνται ποτέ (πολύ καλό), τον Παρία, το Σάρκα και Αίμα, την Έκσταση Θανάτου, το Σκοτεινό Φάσμα, το Τραύμα και όταν τα τελείωσα όλα άρχισα να ψάχνω στο Μοναστηράκι για μια παλιά σειρά βιβλιων τσέπης δεκαετίας 80, με την ονομασία η Βιβλιοθήκη του τρόμου, απο την οποία κυκλοφορούσαν 5 τίτλοι του Μάστερτον.

Μανιτού, η εκδίκηση του Μανιτού, το Τζίν, η Σφίγγα και οι Δαίμονες της Νορμανδίας!

Νομίζω ότι οι εκδόσεις Gemma press έχουν αρχίσει και ξαναεκδίδουν κάποια απο τα παλαιότερα βιβλία του!

 

Γενικά πάντα ξέρεις τι θα γράψει και με ποιον τρόπο!

Υστερεί λίγο στο τέλος του βιβλίου αλλά κατά τα άλλα είναι καλός.

Μελετάει πολύ, βασίζεται σε μια κλασσική ιστορία, σε έναν θρύλο τον οποίο και μεταφέρει στη σύγχροινοι εποχή!

Τα βιβλία του συνήθως ξεκινάνε πολύ δυνατά! Στα πρώτα δύο κεφάλαια έχει γίνει μακελειό, το οποίο σε πολλές περιπτώσεις αποτελεί ένα τελετουργικό για την εμφάνιση ενός δαίμονα!

ίδιο μοτίβο σε πολλά βιβλία, αλλά εμένα προσωπικά δεν με κουράζει.

Πετυχημένη συνταγή, ευφάνταστοι τρόποι θανάτου και βασανιστηρίων, δαίμονες, πνεύματα και ένα συνήθως μέτριο, σπάνια καλό και συχνά απαράδεκτο τέλος!

 

Θα διαβάσω ότι νέο κυκλοφορήσει :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
DinoHajiyorgi

Κάποτε είχα όλη την Βιβλιοθήκη του Τρόμου, μέχρι που την δώρησα πριν κάποια χρόνια σε μια τοπική Βιβλιοθήκη. Ο Μάστερτον, από τους αγαπημένους μου, ήταν η αιτία που ξεκίνησα τη σειρά εκείνων των βιβλίων. Αν και διάβασα πρώτα την "Εκδίκηση" και μετά το πρώτο, βρήκα το στυλ του λίγο "Μάρβελ κόμικς" από τον τρόπο που συντελούνταν οι συγκρούσεις με το υπερφυσικό στο τέλος. Αυτά βέβαια στη δεκαετία του 80. Το όνομα του άρχισε να ξαναγίνεται γνωστό όπως βλέπω τελευταία. Έχω χάσει κάποια έργα του και πλην του iliosporos δεν βλέπω να έχει αναφερθεί ποτέ πουθενά το Δαίμονες της Νορμανδίας, ένα βιβλίο που με είχε συναρπάσει η ιδέα του. [Τα κόκαλα ενός δαίμονα εντοιχισμένα μέσα στο λείψανο ενός τανκ.] Τελειώνει με άλλο ένα Μαρβελικό φινάλε σύγκρουσης αγγέλων και δαιμόνων.

Link to post
Share on other sites
iliosporos

Καλά Ντίνο με αποτελείωσες!!

Είχες όλη τη σειρά η βιβλιοθήκη του τρόμου απο τις εκδόσεις Σιμωσις και την έκανες δωρεά στην τοπική βιβλιοθήκη!!

Και εγώ έχω πάει στο Μοναστηράκι τουλάχιστον 20 φορές μόνο με σκοπό να βρω βιβλία της συγκεκριμένης ανθολογίας;;

Πάντως η αλήθεια είναι ότι έχει πολλά αριστουργήματα αυτή η σειρά!

Εκεί διάβασα και το Τρόμος στο Αμιτυβιλ (Amytyville Horror), το Αίμα (First Blood) δηλαδή την ιστορία του John Rambo το οποίο σαν βιβλίο ήταν εξαιρετικό αλλά και πολλούς άλλους κορυφαίους τίτλους.

Επειδή όμως ξεφεύγουμε απο το Topic έχω να πω

 

Graham Rules!!

 

Y.Γ. Ο Graham Masterton αναφέρει στο βιογραφικό του και κάτι ακόμα. Είναι εγγονός του εφευρέτη του fluo (φωσφοριζέ) Μαρκαδόρου!! Απίστευτο ε;;

Link to post
Share on other sites
Nihilio
Επίσης, αν θα σου ήταν εύκολο, θα ήθελα να γίνεις λίγο πιο συγκεκριμένος : στο Μάνιτου, τί σου άρεσε αρχικά και γιατί μετά "ψιλοχάλαγε" ; στο Black Angel, γιατί το πρώτο κεφάλαιο είναι από τα εντυπωσιακότερα που έχεις διαβάσει (σε ποιά στοιχεία δλδ θα το εντόπιζες αυτό) ;

Για το Μανιτού, μου άρεσε πολύ το πως έχτιζε το κλίμα, την ατμόσφαιρα μυστηρίου και τις αποκαλύψεις, ο ρυθμός του. Με χάλασε όμως λίγο το εύρημα του τέλους, ήταν μεν έξυπνο, αλλά με πέταξε λίγο έξω από το κλίμα του υπόλοιπου βιβλίου.

 

Για τον Άρχοντα του Ψεύδους δε σχολιάζω: το πρώτο κεφάλαιο σε κερδίζει με την υπερβολικά σκληρή και σαδιστική βία του. Το υπόλοιπο βιβλίο όμως είναι σα να έχει γραφτεί στον αυτόματο, με το ενδιαφέρον τον κεφαλάιων να μειώνεται με γεωμετρική πρόοδο.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 7 months later...

Έχω διαβάσει: Το Μανιτού, Η εκδίκηση του Μανιτού, Ο Δαίμονας ξαναζωντανεύει, Οι Δαίμονες της Νορμανδίας, Το Τζίν, Η Σφίγγα..

Θα συμφωνήσω.

Οι χαρακτήρες καλοί, η ατμόσφαιρα καλή, ο ρυθμός καλός, το τέλος άθλιο..

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Spark changed the title to Συνέντευξη με τον Graham Masterton

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

You agree to the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..