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Θάνατοι συγγραφέων στο χώρο του Φανταστικού.


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heiron

Πεθανε και ο γνωστος καλλιτεχνης Frank Fraztetta .Τα σχεδια του ηταν μαλλον κλασικα στο χωρο του φαντασυ.

http://www.comicsbeat.com/2010/05/10/frank-frazetta-rip/

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Daniel Keyes (1927-2014)   Όταν ο εκδότης τού είπε "έχεις γράψει μια καλή ιστορία, αλλά τώρα θα σου πω πώς ν' αλλάξεις το ειδύλλιο και το τέλος για να την κάνεις μια πραγματικά καλή ιστορία" ευτυχώς

Εφυγε ο Γιωργος Μπαλανος σε ηλικια 76 ετων. 

RIP Btw, για μια στιγμή νόμισα πως ο Κόμης είδε το 2010 δια γυμνού οφθαλμού το συκώτι ενός ζωντανού ανθρώπου.

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Naroualis

Όχι ρε παιδιά. Όχι ο Φραζέττα... :(

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Δημήτρης

Ωχ πέθανε ο Frazetta; Κρίμα, πολύ κρίμα. Ήξερα φυσικά πως ήταν ηλικιωμένος και άρρωστος, αλλά και πάλι στενοχωρήθηκα. Λοιπόν τι μπορεί να πει κανείς για την τέχνη του; Ο τύπος έβαλε σε εικόνες την ηρωική φαντασία -και ιδίως το barbaric epic- με τον καλύτερο δυνατό τρόπο που θα μπορούσε να το κάνει κανείς. Πρέπει να έχω ένα art book του, αν θυμάμαι καλά. Φαντάζομαι ότι οι περισσότεροι θα τον γνωρίζετε από τις εικονογραφίσεις του Κόναν, αλλά εγώ προσωπικά θεωρώ ως αριστούργημα του, το φοβερό και τρομερό Death Dealer.

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heiron

O γνωστος fantasy artist Bob Eggleton για το θανατο του Φραζετα:

 

"FRANK FRAZETTA-RIP. The elder god of fantasy art has gone to Valhalla...."

Νομίζω συνψιζει τις αποψεις πολλων.

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Δημήτρης

O γνωστος fantasy artist Bob Eggleton για το θανατο του Φραζετα:

 

"FRANK FRAZETTA-RIP. The elder god of fantasy art has gone to Valhalla...."

Νομίζω συνψιζει τις αποψεις πολλων.

Ουάου!!!!! Τι ήταν αυτό που είπε ο Eggleton; Εγώ δεν θα μπορούσα να το σκεφτώ ακόμη και αν ζούσα δέκα ζωές. Πραγματικά αυτό τα λέει όλα. Υποκλίνομαι.-

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Writer George McDonald Ewing, 64, died May 18, 2010 of a heart attack in Tampa FL.

 

Ewing attended Clarion in 1973, and began selling stories soon after, beginning with “Black Fly” in Analog (1974). Further stories appeared in Asimov’s and other publications in the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s. He was also a freelance non-fiction writer, frequent panelist at conventions, and an avid amateur radio operator.

 

 

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heiron

Πεθανε ο Ewing?!?

 

ewing_knicks.jpg

 

Oh,wait..Κατι καταλαβα λαθος μαλλον...Δε νομιζω να γραφει ΕΦ αυτος.

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Dancer, choreographer, and author Jeanne Robinson died May 30, 2010, at home and surrounded by family, after a long battle with biliary tract cancer. According to husband Spider Robinson, “Her departure was quite peaceful and she was in no pain at all.” Robinson’s many years as a dancer informed her collaborations with Spider Robinson; their novel Stardance (1979), about zero-gravity dance, was followed by sequels Starseed (1991) and Starmind (1995). A novella version of Stardance won both the Hugo and Nebula awards.

 

 

Robinson studied dance at the Boston Conservatory and with the Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey schools, founded the Nova Dance Theatre company in 1980, and served as its artistic director until its closure in 1987. NASA invited Robinson to be the first dancer to dance in space in 1980, however, the Challenger tragedy ended the project. In 2007, Robinson observed and choreographed a dance in a zero-gravity environment, accompanying dancer Kathleen McDonagh aboard a Zero-G plane. She is survived by her husband Spider, daughter Terri, and granddaughter Marisa.

 

 

 

 

 

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Arthur Herzog III, 83, died May 26, 2010 from complications of a stroke. Herzog’s 16 novels included several works of SF interest, most notably debut The Swarm (1974), about killer bees. Herzog was born April 6, 1927 in Manhattan. He attended Stanford as an undergrad, and got his Master’s in English Literature at Columbia in 1955. He married six times, and is survived by wife Leslie Mande-Herzog, a son, and three grandchildren.

 

 

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Nobel Prize-winning Portuguese author José Saramago, 87, died Friday June 18, 2010, at home on the island of Lanzarote in the Spanish Canary Islands, after a long illness. Saramago received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1998; he was the first Portuguese-language author to receive this honor.

Many of his works dealt with fantastic themes, notably allegorical novel Ensaio sobre a Cegueira (1995; in English as Blindness, 1997), about a nameless country whose citizens are all stricken with blindness.

 

Saramago was born November 16, 1922 in Azinhaga Portugal, and grew up in Lisbon. He worked as a journalist and translator, and was an editor at newspaper Diario de Lisboa. After the overthrow of the nascent Portugese Communist revolution in 1975, Saramago focused on writing fiction. His works have since been translated into more than 25 languages.

 

Saramago was an outspoken Communist and atheist, views which sometimes brought him into conflict with conservative Catholic elements in Portugal. After the Portuguese government prevented his novel, The Gospel According to Jesus Christ, from competing for the European Literary Prize, Saramago left Portugal, relocating to the Canary Islands in 1992.

 

Saramago was married twice, to Ilda Reis in 1944, and to Pilar del Rio in 1988; he is survived by his wife and a daughter from his first marriage.

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A badly burned body presumed to be that of author Fergus Gwynplaine MacIntyre was found June 25, 2010 in Brooklyn NY. He apparently committed suicide by setting fire to his apartment.

 

His exact age (and many other biographical details) are uncertain, but he was probably around 60. He began publishing short fiction in the ’80s, and his poems and stories appeared regularly in Asimov’s, Amazing, Analog, Weird Tales, and other publications. The Woman Between Worlds, his only novel under the MacIntyre name, appeared in 1994. Some of his poetry and humor pieces were collected in MacIntyre’s Improbable Bestiary (2001).

 

 

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Irish SF and horror writer Stephen Gilbert, 97, died June 23, 2010 in Whiteabbey, Northern Ireland. Gilbert is best known for Ratman’s Notebooks (1968), the inspiration for 1971 horror film Willard. He also wrote fantasy novel Landslide (1943), SF novel Monkeyface, and The Burnaby Experiments: An Account of the Life and Work of John Burnaby and Marcus Brownlow (1952), about “psychic translocation.”

 

Born July 22, 1912 in Newcastle, Northern Ireland, Gilbert served in WWII; his experiences inspired war novel Bombardier (1944). He also worked as a journalist and was a successful businessman.

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British author James P. Hogan, 69, died in his home in the Republic of Ireland on July 12, 2010. The cause of death has not yet been determined. Hogan, a hard SF writer, won three Seiun Awards and two Prometheus Awards. Hogan is best known for the Minervan Experiment or Giants series, beginning with debut novel Inherit the Stars (1977) and continuing with The Gentle Giants of Ganymede (1978), Giants’ Star (1981), and Entoverse (1991).

 

Hogan was born in London on June 27, 1941. He completed five years of study at the Royal Aircraft Establishment in Farnborough, and was subsequently employed as a design engineer, a traveling sales engineer, and a sales manager. He became a full-time writer in 1979. He married four times and is survived by fourth wife Sheryl and six children.

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SF writer Frank King Kelly, 95, died June 11, 2010 in Santa Barbara CA. Kelly began publishing SF with “The Light Bender” in Wonder Stories (1931), and published a number of stories, mostly dark space operas, until he stopped writing fiction in 1935. His stories were eventually collected in Starship Invincible (1979). In 1996, he was inducted into the First Fandom Hall of Fame.

 

Born June 12, 1914 in Kansas City MO, Kelly served in WWII, and worked as a journalist, non-fiction writer, and speechwriter for Harry Truman. He co-founded the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions in 1959, and the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation in 1982, and remained active in both well into the 21st century. The Frank K. Kelly Lecture on Humanity’s Future was established in his honor in 2002.

 

 

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British author E.C. Tubb, 90, died September 10, 2010 at home in London. He began publishing SF with “No Short Cuts” in 1951 (New Worlds). During his career he produced over 230 stories and 130 novels, most space opera and SF adventure, under his own name and more than 50 pseudonyms and house names.

He is best known for his sprawling 32-volume Dumarest Saga, which began in 1967 with The Winds of Gath and concluded with Child of Earth (2009).

Tubb’s first novel was Saturn Patrol (1951, as King Lang), followed by other early books Planetfall (1951, as Gill Hunt) and Argentis (1952, as Brian Shaw). The first novel under his own name was Alien Impact (1952) . His Cap Kennedy series about a galactic secret agent began with Galaxy of the Lost (1973) and concluded with The Galactiad (1983). His dystopia To Dream Again is forthcoming in 2011.

Edward Charles Tubb was born October 15, 1919 in London. He became a fan of SF before WWII, collecting magazines as a teenager and helping to found the British Science Fiction Association. He married Iris Kathleen Smith in 1944, and is survived by their two daughters, two granddaughters, and a number of great-grandchildren.

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Orbit Books has reported that Jennifer Rardin, author of the Jaz Parks urban fantasy series, died unexpectedly on September 20, 2010 at age 45. No further details are available at this time. Rardin was born April 28, 1965. First novel Once Bitten, Twice Shy appeared in October 2007. The seventh and final book in the series, Bitten in Two, will appear this November. She is survived by her husband and two children.

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Οκ,δεν ηταν συγγραφεας αλλα ατζεντης.Δειτε ομως με ποιους ειχε συνεργαστει και τι λεγανε για αυτον και θα διαπιστωσετε πως ειναι μεγαλη η απωλεια του Ralph Vicinanza.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100928/ap_en_ot/us_obit_vicinanza

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Damn!!!!! :o Δεν ήταν συγγραφέας, αλλά... ήταν πραγματικά θρύλος στο χώρο, και σ' αυτόν οφείλουν την επιτυχία τους πάρα πολλοί... Πραγματικά κρίμα... :( :( :(

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John Steakley, 59, died November 27, 2010 at home in McKinney TX after a long illness. Steakley was born July 26, 1951 in Cleburne TX, and began publishing SF with “The Bluenose Limit” in Amazing (1981). He is best known for military SF novel Armor (1984). He also wrote horror novel Vampire$ (1990) — made into the film Vampires in 1998 — and contributed stories to the shared world Horseclans anthology series. He was a screenwriter and actor as well.

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Author, bookseller, and collector Jerry Weist, 61, died January 7, 2011 after a long struggle with cancer. Weist wrote the Hugo Award winning Ray Bradbury: An Illustrated Life (2002) and The 100 Greatest Comic Books (2004). He was an art expert with an emphasis on comic book, pulp, and science fiction art, and wrote two editions of The Comic Art Price Guide, with a third edition completed shortly before his death and forthcoming. Born September 16, 1949, Weist grew up in Wichita KS. He began producing his own fanzines in 1962 with Nightmare and Movieland Monsters, and later edited and published E.C. Comics fanzine Squa Tront (1967-1983). He moved to New York in 1972 to be an artist, with his work featured in one-man shows and galleries. He relocated to Boston, where he opened early comic book store The Million Year Picnic in 1974. After a decade as a bookseller he moved back to New York, where he spent ten years as a consultant with Sotheby’s auction house, organizing their first major comic book and comic art auction in 1991. He is survived by his wife and two children.

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melkiades

Μα είπα κι εγώ τόσο καιρό και δεν λέει να πεθάνει κάποιος? Είχα αρχίσει να ανησυχώ.

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DinoHajiyorgi

Μα είπα κι εγώ τόσο καιρό και δεν λέει να πεθάνει κάποιος? Είχα αρχίσει να ανησυχώ.

Δημοσιευμένοι και αδημοσίευτοι, γράφουμε-γράφουμε για να ξεγελάσουμε τον θάνατο και να κερδίσουμε την αθανασία, στο τέλος όμως ταΐζουμε όλοι τα σκουλήκια.

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Author Brian Jacques, 71, died February 5, 2011 of a heart attack in Liverpool. Jacques is best known for his Redwall series of children’s fantasies, beginning with Redwall (1987) and continuing for more than 20 books, most recently The Sable Quean (2010) and forthcoming The Rogue Crew (2011). His other books include the Castaways of the Flying Dutchman series (2001-2006), two short fiction collections, and picture books for younger children.

 

James Brian Jacques was born June 15, 1939 in Liverpool, and worked variously as a merchant sailor, longshoreman, truck driver, railway fireman, and radio broadcaster, where he hosted the long-running show Jakestown on BBC Radio Merseyside.

 

 

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Romanian science fiction writer Ion Hobana, 80, died of cancer on Tuesday, February 22, 2011 in Bucharest. Hobana was Romania’s best internationally known SF writer. Hobana was born January 25, 1931 in Sannicolau Mare, near Timisoara, and studied science fiction literature at the University of Bucharest. He started publishing science fiction stories in 1955, and his stories have been translated into over 20 languages. He was an editor, translator, and historian, publishing a number of works on Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, French SF, and Romanian SF, as well as works on UFOs. Hobana received an award for his work from Poland’s Ministry of Culture and Arts.

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Writer Lisa Wolfson, 47, who wrote young-adult novels as L.K. Madigan, died February 23, 2011 of cancer in Portland OR. Her first novel Flash Burnout (2009) is non-speculative, but second book The Mermaid’s Mirror (2010) is fantasy. Lisa Kay Madigan was born April 26, 1963 in Portland OR, and moved with her family to Los Angeles at age ten. She attended California State University, Northridge and the University of Bradford in Yorkshire, England. She lived with her family in Portland, where she spent 16 years working for an investment management firm. She is survived by Neil Wolfson (her husband of 22 years), and their son Nate.

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